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20121222
20121230
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
for "politico." josh rogin is a staff writer at "foreign policy" magazine. >> senator kerry will be nominated to be the next secretary of state. i went to get your first reaction to this and whether you think he is a better nominee than susan rice. >> i think in the world of john kerry -- i supported him for president. why wouldn't i support him for secretary of state? he is knowledgeable of foreign policy. he has chaired the foreign relations committee in the senate, knows all the issues. he understands the politics. he understands the electoral politics as well. i think it is an excellent choice. i think he will be very good secretary of state. susan rice withdrew from the nomination. i do not think it is fair to compare it the two. i think john kerry will be an excellent secretary. >> why you think it is not fair to compare the two? >> the rumor was that she was his first choice, but we do not really know if that is the truth. we've got to compare john kerry with john kerry, not with somebody else. >> what do you think his biggest hurdle will be in his upcoming confirmation hearings? >> i
is knowledgeable of foreign policy. he has chair the foreign relations committee in the senate, knows all the issues. he understands the politics. he understands the electoral politics as well. i think it is an excellent choice. i think he will be very good secretary of state. susan rice withdrew from the nomination. i do not think it is fair to compare it the two. i think john kerry will be an excellent secretary. >> what you think it is not fair to compare the two? >> the rumor was that she was his first choice, but we do not really know if that is the truth. we've got to compare john kerry with john kerry, not with somebody else. >> what do you think his biggest hurdle will be in his upcoming confirmation hearings? >> i do not think will have much of a hurdle. the senators know him. there has been a tendency for the senate to easily confirmed one of their own. he is knowledgeable. no one is going to deny that. he has all the credentials necessary to be a good secretary of state. >> mr. rogin? >> the senate usually does confirm members -- we know there is a huge opposition to the nomina
and in iran nuclear program continues to progress. look at the foreign policy challenges facing the united states in 2013. because youry wants that pink castle thing. and you realldon't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it findone, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all youeed is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. start saving at citi.com/pricerewind. [ buzzing ] bye dad. drive safe. k. love you. [ chirping, buzzing continues ] [ horn honks ] [ buzzing continues ] [ male announcer ] the sprint drive first app. blocks and replies to texts while you drive. we can live without the &. visit sprint.com/drive. aww man. [ male announcer ] returns are easy with free pickup from the u.s. postal service. we'll even drop off boxes if you need them. visit usps.com pay, print, and have it picked up for free. any time of year. ♪ nice sweater. thank you. ♪ >> from iran's nuclear ambition toss china's nationalist im
. for some time now, overseas resources have been cut or withheld, and important foreign policy objectives have been starved. consider that last year we spent approximately $650 billion on our military. by contrast, the international affairs budget is less than one-tenth of the pentagon's. secretary gates has spoken about this and strongly urged the congress to address that imbalance. we have not yet. admiral mullen pointed out, the more diplomacy is cut, the more lives are lost. we have to make certain that we are not penny-wise and pound- foolish when it comes to supporting america's vital overseas interests. adequately funding foreign- policy initiatives is not spending, but investing in our long-term security, and more often or not, it saves far more expensive expenditures in dollars and lives in the conflicts that we fail to see or avoid. we need to invest in america's long-term interest in order to do the job of diplomacy in a dangerous world. this report makes that crystal clear. since 1985, i have had the privilege of making official journeys to one trouble spot or another. i have
the preoccupation of the committee and a preoccupation of the foreign policy and those concerned with foreign policy nationwide. why now? partly because this time we lost an ambassador and a great man. but mostly, it's because now benghazi isn't just a loss of diplomats, we have lost some before, but now there is a partisan advantage to be sought by one side or the other . this incident was an important, but is it more important than the north korean nuclear program? is it more important than the other subjects that haven't been the subject of so many hearings of this committee? we have now decided to focus on the politics security in part because we can blame one party or the other. we can blame the state department for not allocating its resources to diplomatic security or blame the republican congress for not appropriating the enough. we should do more for diplomatic security. this department should follow its own procedures, and we have not done so. we would like to believe in the world that is subject somehow to our control, that if we just do the right thing everything will turn out right. thi
a fascinating window into how foreign policy interest groups operate and has obscured the central question is hagel an ideal candidate to lead the department of defense and where is the department of defense going in the future. joining me is glenn greenwald, and we have the former senior adviser to the united nations tour on executions. spencer ackerman, the national security blog for the danger room and elise jordan who worked under condoleezza rice. i will admit, i did not realize chuck hagel was a polarizing figure until this whole thing went down. were you surprised by the reaction to hagel? >> in jewish day school we are taught that chuck hagel will come and drink our blood. so i guess it is not surprising, but the manufactured outrage of this has been just disgusting to see. you saw in a clip that you played, the audio clip, the very next thing he says discusses the contradictory and the counterproductive elements that advocates for israel often engage in, that seems they are now demonstrating right now. that hagel talks about the interest of israel. >> i think there's a strain in w
implications for the foreign policy and wha in what is happen the middle east, john negroponte, the first director of national intelligence appointed by george w. bush serving five times as an investor and in his distinguished career in intelligence and diplomacy. great to have you with us. >> thank you. lou: let's start with the middle east. president morsi, ordering the military to arrest civilians. what is your reaction? >> i just think it is administration of the precariousness of the situation in egypt, but that situation is critical. we can't afford to see egypt go over some kind of a brink. they are crucial to the middle east peace process. wo perhaps if egypt were to pull back from the recognition of israel, the largest arab country population in the region, therev is a critical role to play in many different ways. lou: the way his administration has engaged the muslim brotherhood, the army and egypt and what the likely result will be, are you optimistic that his diplomacy is on the correct path? >> i think it started out quite seriously, nobody knew what was going to happen when
you wrote about in a recent piece for foreign policy magazine, that the polarization around the constitution actually reflected in your view some broader divisions within egyptian society. the next step in this competition, if you will, within the egyptian polity, is going to be parliamentary elections, which as i understand it are supposed to take place just a couple of months after the constitution is approved, assuming that it is ultimately approved. what can you tell us based on what we've seen over the last couple of months about how the competition for parliamentary elections is likely to shape up? >> sure. thanks, tammy. so, yes, in theory there is supposed to be parliamentary elections within two months. i think the big question here are liberals and non-islamists going to be brought back into the democratic process or are there still going to be elements that say the whole process is flawed, rigged, illegitimate, and they start to withdraw. and there was this debate in the lead-up to the referendum where you had parts of the opposition saying boycott because they do
seem to be a foreign-policy, a policy foreign to the roast great deliberative body. >> to think of people who ran in 2010 and got elected with the people who ran before it ended now ascended to of leadership leave no with a solution or they were elected to not do things as opposed to do things? >> again, from the class of 2010 and now i refer to the 87 freshman, the so-called tea party class of the 112 congress, their belief is they are doing precisely what the people who elected them wish to do, which is rollback obama initiatives to cut spending. a lot of them thought the debt ceiling should not be increased under any circumstances and to that degree feel like i was. they basically believe their job is to obstruct barack obama and once there is a republican president in place from the two pass this initiative secreted better business climate, more and more deregulation committee funding of programs that have never quite been near and dear to them. of course to flash forward a day, i suspect we'll talk about the debt ceiling fiasco of 2011. after that summer undertaken to the b
of the obama administration foreign policy. remember this was their big success, leading from behind. it fits into the administration narrative that the war on terror is over. that al qaeda has been defeated. that the arab spring has brought democracy to libya and the middle east. all that was disproven by the tragedy in benghazi on september the 11th and i think these are all questions senators want to hear answers to. gregg: do you think she and president obama both were convinced that the war on terror was over an al qaeda was defeated? >> yeah. i think their world view is badly misguided and i think it was ideology more than anything else that convinced them that certainly this could not have been a terrorist attack. it must have been a response by some demonstration, protesting the mohammed video, getting out of control. a lot of people in congress have said the mohammed video story was a cover-up. i actually hope for the good of the country that is true because at least it would demonstrate that the president understood reality. he was trying to sweep it aside. i'm worried that the ideo
. vladimir putin banned americans from adopting russian children. my take on obama's latest foreign policy failure. >> this is what is coming to me. this is what i deserve. this is what i alone. who are you? our responsibility is to say before the holidays start let's talk about what you think you are getting and where i am as a parent. stuart: that was in the last hour, how ungrateful kids use social media to complain about christmas gifts. tune in weekday mornings, we start at 9:20 sharp. we have a drop, 89 points laura, the dow resting at 13,000 as we speak. all retailers, most of them on the eastern seaboard are going to get hurt if the port strike happens first inning sunday morning. home depot could be hurt more than most and the stock is always down. >> home depot is down 1%. talking the past couple months how retailers do 40% of their business in the holiday quarter. the home depot quarter is in the spring when people fix up their homes and this is the time of year they get their inventory in to stock their shelves when people make the investments and if this strike happens that ha
with the united states government and that is, i'll support you are foreign policy initiatives in the region by and large if you stay out of my internal affairs. i think that's where he is right now. it appears like the united states government is doing just that. heather: take this beyond the borders of egypt to the area of the middle east, what does this mean for the rest of the ream on? >> well, it is pretty significant. egypt is the a very influential country. even though it is one of the poorest countries in the region, it is a powerful arab country. it has a powerful military for sure and has significant intellectual and cultural influence on the region. so what goes on in egypt truly matters. listen, the contours of this revolutionary change taking place in the middle east, certainly the catalyst for it was democratic and social reform and economic opportunity but the radicals, the muslim brotherhood, are easy seeing the opportunity to advantage themselves geopolitically in the region. that is the danger here. that this continues to move in that direction in other parts of the region.
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)